Discrimination

Discrimination

We challenge systemic discrimination in all its forms. We apply an intersectional lens to all our litigation, working with partners to also identify discriminatory factors in our work on Civic Space and Democratic Accountability and Conflict and Security Force Abuses.

Our work on discrimination currently focuses on:

  • Gender-based violence [GBV]*. GBV is a systemic issue in our region, evident in the inadequate protections afforded by existing legal frameworks, the discriminatory practices of law enforcement and traditional societal attitudes. We challenge legislation, policies and practices that fail to protect – and negatively impact – survivors of gender-based violence. We continue to develop partnerships on GBV across the region.
  • Discrimination against the LGBTQI+ community. The countries in which we work consistently rank at the bottom of ILGA’s Rainbow Index, the annual survey of how safe European countries are for the LGBTQI+ community. LGBTQI+ people are extremely marginalised and vulnerable, with prejudice used to support anti-gay laws. We have seen a rise in physical attacks and online abuse, with the sense of impunity often supported by the inflammatory rhetoric of politicians. We challenge LGBTQI+ hate speech, hate crimes, and inadequate legislative frameworks; and work on behalf of the most marginalised communities, to address under-litigated issues, including the need for clear processes on intersex and transgender recognition.

In all our litigation, we employ a victim-centred approach. We have promoted and embedded Trauma-Informed Legal Practice (TILP) within EHRAC and are working with partners to mainstream this approach across our region.

*We use the term ‘gender-based violence’ to encompass all harmful acts directed at an individual based on their gender and that are rooted in gender inequality, the abuse of power and harmful norms. We recognise that gender-based violence disproportionately impacts women.

VIDEO: Litigating Georgia's first femicide case at the European Court of Human Rights

Content warning: this video includes descriptions of domestic violence, femicide and suicide.

Tkhelidze v Georgia, co-litigated with the Georgian Young Lawyers Association (GYLA), concerns the femicide of M.T., a university professor, by her ex-husband after a prolonged period of domestic violence.

Despite multiple reports of threats and violence being made to the police, not a single protective measure was put in place. This case is representative of the systemic discrimination by law enforcement authorities in Georgia in failing to adequately respond to victims of domestic violence.